Lunch and Learn Lecture Series

 

Lunch and Learn
The Gershman Y
Wednesdays • 12:30-1:30 pm
$12 each • $30 series
(Save $6 and RSVP for the whole series HERE!)

Pack your lunch and join us for our lecture series that explores cultural and historical moments through the Jewish lens. 

THE INVISIBLE HARRY GOLD • March 14

In the history of Soviet espionage in the United States, few people figure more crucially than Harry Gold. Gold, born in Switzerland and of Russian-Jewish parentage, spied for the Soviets from 1935 to 1950, and is literally the man who handed the USSR the plans for the atom bomb. Allen M. Hornblum, local author and historian, recounts the life of this little known Philadelphia industrial chemist, whom at one time was the subject of the most intensive public manhunt in the history of the FBI and helped the FBI discover the Rosenberg spy ring. The Invisible Harry Gold, Allen M. Hornblum’s written work of Harry Gold’s life, will be available for purchase. RSVP HERE!

2,000 YEARS OF JEWISH HISTORY THROUGH SYNAGOGUE ARCHITECTURE • April 25

Throughout the history of the Jewish people, synagogue architecture has varied over the centuries since the destruction of the Temple and the Jewish diaspora. Ironically, synagogues lacked a defined architectural style until 1959 when famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright designed Beth Sholom Congregation in suburban Philadelphia. Barbara Cohen, ASID, President of the Schuylkill River Heritage Center, will trace the history of the Jewish people through the architecture of synagogues and discuss the many stylistic adaptations synagogues adopted in relation to the place, time, and world events during construction. RSVP HERE!

JEWS AND THE 1936 AND 1972 OLYMPICS • May 16

The 1936 and 1972 Olympics held in Germany were rife with social and political struggles. For the Jewish people and athletes, the plague of anti-Semitism, death and destruction created a conflict of emotions — fear, pride, shame, and more. William Rosenberg, PhD, Professor of Political Science at Drexel University, will compare and contrast both German Olympic Games and the lasting impact that these events had on the Jewish people and the greater world. RSVP HERE!

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